Monthly Archives: July 2017

Tiny House as SILP?

Q: We have a non-minor dependent (NMD) who would like to purchase a “Tiny House”. This NMD has saved up the down payment and the former foster parents have agreed to let this youth park it on their property. The Tiny House is mobile so the NMD could move the house as their situation changes. Can this NMD reside in the Tiny House as a Supervised Independent Living Placement (SILP)?

A: Yes, the Tiny House could be the NMD’s SILP, as long as the social worker or probation officer approves it. Approving a SILP is a two-part process that consists of:

  • a SILP Readiness Assessment to indicate whether or not the NMD has knowledge of financial skills and is developmentally ready to handle daily tasks on their own, and a financial plan to meet his/her living expenses while living in the SILP.
  • an inspection checklist (SOC 157B) to determine that the living unit meets basic health and safety standards. This is done during a walkthrough of the site with the NMD.

Citation: All County Letter 11-77 (2011) http://www.cdss.ca.gov/lettersnotices/entres/getinfo/acl/2011/11-77.pdf

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Eligibility for 12 Month Extension of THP-Plus

Q: My county is one of the 21 counties that have opted into the THP-Plus 12-month extension for youth enrolled in school. I am working with a youth who entered the program at age 23. How will the extension work for her? Does she get the full 24 months of eligibility and then an extra 12 months, provided she is enrolled in school?

A: No, in this example the youth would not get the full 24 months of eligibility and then an extra 12 months because she entered at age 23.

The upper age limit of THP-Plus is 24. AB 1252 allows a youth who is enrolled in school to receive an extra year of eligibility, up to age 25.

In this specific case, the youth would be eligible for THP-Plus until age 24 and then receive an additional 12 months of eligibility provided she remained enrolled in school. Once she turns age 25, she would no longer be eligible for the program.

For more information, including a list of the 21 counties that have extended THP-Plus for youth who are enrolled in school, follow this LINK.

Satisfactory Academic Progress

Q: I have heard that in order to maintain certain forms of financial aid, a student has to maintain “Satisfactory Academic Progress.” What does this mean exactly?

A: Each school has a satisfactory academic progress policy for financial aid purposes and there can be variation across institutions. Typically, there are three components: minimum GPA, the percentage of cumulative units attempted that must be successfully completed, and the requirement that students complete their educational program within a maximum time frame of 150% of the published program’s requirements.

GPA requirements are often set at a minimum of 2.0 but you should check your school’s policy to confirm. The percentage of units that must be successfully completed also varies and generally ranges between 65-80%. Each institution’s policy can typically be found on their website.

The final requirement depends on the type of program a student is enrolled in. For example, if the student is in an Associate Degree program that requires 60 units, the maximum number of units that could be taken before losing financial aid eligibility would be 150% of that or 90 units.

In some cases, a student may be able to appeal for a temporary waiver of the satisfactory academic progress rules. These circumstances include when the failure to make satisfactory academic progress was due to injury or illness of the student, death of a relative of the student or other special circumstances. Students in this circumstance should consult with the financial aid office or foster youth program.

Special Immigrant Juvenile Status & sponsorship

Q: I am a social worker helping a young person apply for Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS). Once she receives it and later becomes a U.S. citizen, she would like to sponsor her sister to immigrate to the U.S. Is that allowable under SIJS?

A: Yes, once she becomes a U.S. citizen (which generally she can apply for after 5 years with her green card), she will be able to sponsor her sister. SIJS does not allow her to ever sponsor her biological or prior adoptive parents.

Citation: 8 U.S.C. § 1101(a)(27)(J)(iii)(II).

For more information about immigration and child welfare, listen to a June 23, 2017 training conducted by the Immigrant Legal Resource Center in partnership with John Burton Advocates for Youth.

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