Statewide List of Comprehensive Sexual Education Providers

Q: I understand that Senate Bill 89 requires county child welfare agencies to ensure that foster youth receive comprehensive sexual education once in middle school and once in high school. I’m working with a youth who missed this class in her high school.

The child welfare agency has attempted to work with the school so that she can take it out of sequence, but it doesn’t appear to be an option. Who can the county worker refer her to in order to receive the required education?

A: You are correct. The California Foster Youth Sexual Health Education Act (Senate Bill 89), which went into effect on July 1, 2017 requires the county child welfare caseworker to ensure that every youth age 10 and older, including non-minor dependents if still in high school, receive comprehensive sexual education (CSE) once in middle school and once in high school. For youth who do not receive CSE, child welfare workers must document in the case plan how that requirement will be met.

The California Healthy Youth Act (CHYA) requires that schools provide CSE to students, however some foster youth miss this course as a result of school changes or absences. For a youth who misses CSE, the child welfare worker should first try to coordinate with the student’s school/district to provide the course out of sequence, over the summer, or if a multi-school district, at another school. If this is not possible, the child welfare worker must refer that student to a community-based provider to receive CSE.

To find a provider in your area, first check this roster to see if there is an organization funded to provide CSE through the Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) or the Information & Education (I&E) Program. If there is not a PREP or I&E provider in your area, refer to this statewide roster of Planned Parenthood affiliates, which notes whether they provide CHYA-compliant CSE for interested parties.

For more information about SB 89, visit a page on the JBAY website: http://www.jbaforyouth.org/california-foster-youth-sexual-health-education-act-sb89/.

Citation:

Statewide Planned Parenthood Roster maintained by JBAY: http://www.jbaforyouth.org/plannedparenthoodlist/

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Non-Minor Dependents in the Military

Q: I’m working with a youth who is interested in joining the military. Can he still participate in extended foster care if he enlists?

A: He can participate in extended foster care as long as he is not on active duty in the military. A person who is on active duty is a full-time member of the military, and this includes the period of basic training (also known as boot camp).

Persons in the military reserves or National Guard are considered part-time military personnel, and so they are not on active duty and are eligible for extended foster care benefits (if all other extended foster care eligibility requirements are met) until called upon to serve in active duty.

Youth who are enlisted in the military but not on active duty (including those participating in a ROTC program), are eligible for extended foster care except during extended training if the military program does not allow a social worker/probation officer to conduct monthly visitation and supervision during this time. The youth would be eligible to re-enter foster care as soon as caseworker visitation can resume.

Citation: California Department of Social Services. All County Letter No. 18-101, Eligibility for Extended Foster Care (EFC) For Married Youth and Youth Performing Non-Active Duty Military Service, (September 12, 2018). http://www.cdss.ca.gov/Portals/9/ACL/2018/18-101.pdf

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Are there any circumstances in which minors can receive their foster care payment directly?

Q: I understand a new law went into effect this year that allows youth under age 18 to receive their foster care payment directly if they are enrolled in college and living in a dorm. Is that the case?

A: Yes. Assembly Bill 766 went into effect on January 1, 2018 which allows a minor dependent at least 16 years of age to receive his or her foster care payment directly if they meet each of the following criteria:

  • The minor is enrolled in a post-secondary educational institution, and
  • The minor is living independently in a dormitory or other designated housing of the post-secondary educational institution, and
  • The placement is made pursuant to a supervised placement agreement and Transitional Independent Living Plan (TILP).

Earlier this month, the California Department of Social Services issued All County Letter 18-135 which outlines the requirements of AB 766 and provides instructions to counties about its implementation. Additional information included in the ACL follows:

  • Minors who are receiving court ordered family reunification services are not be eligible to live independently, if the court finds that such placement would impede reunification efforts.
  • Dormitories, other designated university housing, and Job Corps housing are exempt from the health and safety checklist.
  • A new supervised placement agreement form specific to 16-18 year old youth will be made available in the future.

Citation:

Educational Opportunity Program deadlines at Cal State Universities

Q: I am planning to submit an application to a Cal State University this month. I want to apply for the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) and I heard that I need to do that with my application, but I just realized that I need to provide two letters of recommendation to apply for EOP. Is there any way that I can submit the letters after the November 30 application deadline?

A: While you must indicate on your admissions application if you would like to be considered for the Educational Opportunity Program, the deadline for submitting the required materials, including autobiographical essays and letters of recommendation falls after November 30. The deadlines vary by school, and range between December 7 and January 31, depending on the institution. To see the deadline for each institution, follow this LINK.

The CSU’s Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) provides admission, academic and financial support services to historically underserved students throughout California including low-income, first generation and foster youth students. Some foster youth support programs require enrollment in EOP in order to participate. In addition to indicating on the admissions application that they would like to apply for EOP, students must apply for financial aid and must complete autobiographical essay questions and provide two letters of recommendation from individuals who can comment about the student’s potential to succeed in college such as a counselor, teacher, community member, or employer.

Make sure that you apply for the program with your CSU application as students will not be admitted to the program after they enroll in school.

Work Requirements for THP-Plus

Q:  I’m working with a homeless former foster youth who attempted to access housing through our local THP-Plus program, but he was told by a social worker that he did not meet the work requirements to enter the program. Is this part of the THP-Plus eligibility requirements? 

A: No, work requirements are not part of THP-Plus eligibility. Youth eligible for the THP-Plus program:

  • are at least 18 years of age and not more than 24 years of age*
  • have exited from the foster care system on or after his or her 18th birthday
  • have not previously received services through THP-Plus for more than a total of 24 months, whether or not consecutive*
  • *a county may, at its option, extend THP-Plus to a former foster youth not more than 25 years of age, and for a total of 36 months if they are completing secondary education or a program leading to an equivalent credential, or enrolled in an institution that provides postsecondary education.

As a condition of participation in THP-Plus, the youth shall enter into a Transitional Independent Living Plan (TILP) that shall be mutually agreed upon, and annually reviewed by the youth and county welfare or probation department or independent living program coordinator.

While many youth may have employment or education listed as a goal in their TILP, there is no blanket work or school requirement as a condition of THP-Plus eligibility, and there is a high likelihood that youth entering the program are not yet meeting the goals in their TILP, but are working toward them.

Citation: Welfare & Institutions Code 11403.2(a)(2)

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THP-Plus Rates Across the State

Q: I am a THP-Plus provider and we are negotiating our contract for next fiscal year (2019-20). I’d like to compare our THP-Plus rate with others. Is there any one place that you know of where they list the rates that various counties pay?

A: Yes. John Burton Advocates for Youth collects this information as part of its THP+FC & THP-Plus Annual Report. You can find the list of provider rates by county at this LINK. The providers names have been removed.

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Health Assessment and Dental Care Requirement

Q: I am a THP+FC provider. Are Non-Minor Dependents required to get a health check-up every year and if so, who is responsible for ensuring this occurs? What about dental care?

A: Yes, all children, youth and young adults in foster care are required to receive at least one health assessment annually up to age 21. Additionally, children, youth and NMDs in foster care up to age 21 must also receive one dental referral every six-months. This went into effect on July 1, 2016.

The county social worker is responsible for ensuring that children, youth and NMDs in foster care are up-to-date on their annual medical appointments, including dental care. This includes medical appointments where a youth or NMD may receive sexual or reproductive health services.

Sources:

Manual of Policies and Procedures section 31-405.24

All County Letter 17-22

A Guide for Case Managers: Assisting Foster Youth with Healthy Sexual Development and Pregnancy Prevention

Is there an amount required to be spent on clothing within a Resource Family’s foster care rate?

Q: Is any specific amount of a Resource Family’s monthly foster care rate required to be spent on the child’s clothing? And are the foster parents required to keep the receipts for their expenditures?

 A: The clothing allowance payment is solely at the discretion of the counties, so there is no designated clothing amount within the basic foster care monthly rate that the Resource Family receives. Foster parents are not required to keep receipts for clothing purchased.

 Citation: Guidance from California Department of Social Services, Foster Care Audits & Rates Branch

Chafee Application Now Available to Youth Up to Age 26

Q: I heard that the age eligibility for the Chafee grant has been increased so that older youth in college can receive a Chafee grant. When is this going to become available?

A: You are correct. Eligibility for the Chafee grant in California has been expanded so that youth can apply for Chafee if they have not reached their 26th birthday as of July 1st of the award year, and are otherwise Chafee-eligible.*

Funding for the eligibility expansion was included in the 2018-19 State Budget. While the changes to eligibility were included in a budget trailer bill (AB 1811), taking immediate effect on July 1, 2018, students meeting the expanded eligibility requirements were not able to apply for Chafee until October 2018. The updated application is now available at:   https://www.chafee.csac.ca.gov/StudentApplication.aspx.

*To qualify for a Chafee grant, you must meet the following criteria:

  • Be a current or former foster youth who was a ward of the court, living in foster care, for at least one day between the ages of 16 and 18.
  • If you are/were in Kin-GAP, a non-related legal guardianship, or were adopted, you are eligible only if you were a dependent or ward of the court, living in foster care, for at least one day between the ages of 16 and 18.
  • Have not reached your 26th birthday as of July 1st of the award year.
  • Have not participated in the program for more than 5 years (whether or not consecutive).

Pursuant to Assembly Bill 2506, starting with the 2017-18 award year, you can only receive your Chafee Grant if you attend a school that is either of the following:

  • A qualifying institution that is eligible for participation in the Cal Grant Program.
  • An institution that is not located in California with a three-year cohort default rate that is less than 15.5 percent and a graduation rate greater than 30 percent.

Citation:

 

CalFresh Student Eligibility: Approved Programs to Increase Employability

Q: I understand that participation in certain foster youth campus support programs can exempt youth from the CalFresh eligibility restrictions placed on college students. What if a former foster youth enrolled in college is participating in a campus support program that is not named in ACL 15-70, ACL 17-05 or the state’s additional list of exempting programs to increase employability, but essentially provides the same services as Guardian Scholars-type programs?

A: A program not currently on the California Department of Social Services’ (CDSS) list of eligible programs may submit a request to add their program by completing the form provided by CDSS, “Request for Approval of Local Educational Programs that Increase Employability.” This form can be found by visiting: http://www.cdss.ca.gov/inforesources/CalFresh-Resource-Center / “Policy Guidance” / “More Guidance.” For CDSS’ list of eligible programs, go to http://www.cdss.ca.gov/inforesources/CalFresh-Resource-Center and click on “CalFresh Student Eligibility: Approved Programs to Increase Employability.”

To be defined as a program to increase employability, the program must assist in gaining the skills, training, work, or experience that will increase the student’s ability to obtain regular employment, such as job retention, job search, job search training, work experience, workfare, vocational training, self-employment training, on-the-job training and education.

This question and answer are included in JBAY’s newly updated Frequently Asked Questions: Non-Minor Dependents & CalFresh document. Download the FAQ HERE.

Citation:

California Department of Social Services. All County Letter 15-70 (September 17, 2015). http://www.cdss.ca.gov/lettersnotices/EntRes/getinfo/acl/2015/15-70.pdf.

California Department of Social Services. All County Letter 17-05 (February 14, 2017). http://www.cdss.ca.gov/Portals/9/ACL/2017/17-05.pdf?ver=2017-02-15-111331-970.